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Allergy FAQ
When it comes to allergies and asthma, we are sure you have a lot of questions. What is asthma? What are the symptoms? How do I know if I have allergies? How can I prevent allergy attacks?

We are here to help answer those questions. If you would like to prepare for your visit—or you’re just interested in learning more about allergies—browse some of our commonly asked questions below. Of course, if there is something left unanswered here, make sure to ask us during your appointment.

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a chronic lung disease that blocks airflow. During an asthma attack, the bronchial tubes become inflamed and the passage ways become tighter.

Although there is no cure for asthma, working with a professional will allow you to create a treatment plan to keep your symptoms under control, and your doctor can give you a prescription for a medication that will work best with your particular needs. This will help you be able to still participate in normal, everyday activities.

What are some common signs and symptoms of Asthma?

Shortness of breath, chest tightness, wheezing, coughing

How is asthma diagnosed?

A doctor must diagnose asthma by looking at typical symptoms, the patient’s medical and family history, peak flow monitoring/breathing tests, and a physical exam.

What are common symptoms of Allergies?

Typical symptoms include shortness of breath, coughing, sneezing, headaches, itchy eyes, itchy throat or skin, hives, fatigue, and runny noses.

How are allergies diagnosed?

The most common ways to test for allergies include a skin test where pricks of allergy-producing substances are applied to the skin to check for a reaction and a blood allergy test (which, because it is more expensive and not as accurate, is often only used when a skin test cannot be done). A doctor can then work with you to develop a treatment or prevention plan.

What are the most common allergens that lead to allergic reactions?

  • Pollen
  • Dust
  • Insect Stings
  • Food
  • Mold
  • Medications
  • Animal dander
  • Latex

What are some of the things I can do at home to prevent allergy attacks?

The most common ways to test for allergies include a skin test where pricks of allergy-producing substances are applied to the skin to check for a reaction and a blood allergy test (which, because it is more expensive and not as accurate, is often only used when a skin test cannot be done).

A doctor can then work with you to develop a treatment or prevention plan.

What are some common antihistamine products?

The following is a list of common antihistamine products. If you are taking a medication that includes any of these ingredients, you must stop taking that medication 36 hours prior to your allergy-testing appointment.

If you have any questions of whether or not your medication contains an antihistamine, please call your local pharmacy for advice.

Be aware that this is only a partial list:

  • Actifed
  • Alavert/Alavert D
  • Allegra/Allegra D
  • Alka-Seltzer Plus
  • Atarax
  • Antivert
  • Atrohist
  • Astelin Nasal Spray
  • Axid
  • Benadryl
  • Bromfed
  • Cetirizine
  • Chlorpheniramine
  • Chlortrimeton
  • Cimetidine
  • Clarinex (5 day)
  • Claritin/Claritin D
  • Dimetapp
  • Diphenhydoramide
  • Doxepin
  • Doxylamine succinate
  • Drixoral
  • Dramamine
  • Entex LA
  • Polaramine
  • Ranitidine
  • Fexofenadine
  • Hydroxyzine
  • Loratadine
  • Meclizine
  • Nolamine
  • Palgic D & DS Syrup
  • Patanol Eye Drops
  • Pepcid
  • Periactin
  • Phenergan
  • Robitussin PM Cough & Cold
  • Tagamet
  • Tavist
  • Tylenol PM
  • Vicks Nyquil
  • Xyzal
  • Zantac
  • Zyrtec/Zyrtec D



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